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Arun: 10 May : 12:36 AM

Hi Priyank, welcome. Feel free to go through these forum threads returned by search [link]

Priyank: 09 May : 10:28 PM

Hi..need advice. What are the options in Australia after MPT?

Arun: 04 Mar : 02:01 AM

Happy birthday Boopathi and somasimple

PTebook: 04 Nov : 09:39 AM

hello everyone!!!!!!!

nibs: 10 Oct : 09:20 AM

Hello everyone


Physio Blogs by physiowarzish

Apr 29 2016

Exercises for Osteoarthritis of the Knee - The Isometric Knee Exercises

Exercises for Osteoarthritis of the Knee - The Isometric Knee Exercises

Strength of the quadriceps muscles affect the knee joint functions. It is evident that lower extremity strength has a major role in knee joint shock attenuation during weight bearing activities. There is increased risk of development or progression of osteoarthritis due to greater or uncontrolled loading on the knee joint. Reduction of pain and disability is the main aim of treatment approach in the management of knee osteoarthritis.

Relevant anatomy
The quadriceps femoris (four-headed femoral muscle) forms the main bulk of the anterior thigh muscles, and collectively constitutes the largest and one of the most powerful muscles in the body. It covers almost all the anterior aspect and sides of the femur.
The quadriceps consist of four parts:
(1) rectus femoris,
(2) vastus lateralis,
(3) vastus intermedius, and
(4) vastus medialis.
Because of the drastically different orientation of the upper and lower fibers of the vastus medialis muscle, the upper fibers are commonly referred to as the vastus medialis longus (VML), and the lower fibers are referred to as the vastus medialis oblique (VMO).

The tendons of the four parts of the quadriceps unite in the distal portion of the thigh to form a single, strong, broad quadriceps tendon. The patellar ligament (ligamentum patellae), attached to the tibial tuberosity, is the continuation of the quadriceps tendon in which the patella is embedded. The patella is thus the largest sesamoid bone in the body.

Collectively, the quadriceps are a two-joint muscle capable of producing action at both the hip and knee. The quadriceps are the great extensor of the leg. Concentric contraction of the quadriceps to extend the knee against gravity is important during rising from sitting or squatting, climbing and walking up stairs, and for acceleration and projection (running and jumping) when it is lifting or moving the body’s weight.

The quadriceps may be three times stronger than its antagonistic muscle group i.e. the hamstrings.In level walking, the quadriceps muscles become active during the termination of the swing phase, preparing the knee to accept weight. The quadriceps are primarily responsible for absorbing the jarring shock of heel strike, and its activity continues as the weight is assumed during the early stance phase (loading response). It also functions as a fixator during bent-knee sports, such as skiing and tennis, and contracts eccentrically during downhill walking and descending stairs.

There are three types of basic therapeutic exercise: isotonic, isokinetic, and isometric exercise. Of these three, isometric exercise might be the most appropriate and easy to understand by the patients and can be easily and safely performed at home because it requires no or minimal apparatus. Isometric exercise is an active exercise performed against stable resistance, without change in the length of the muscle. Further, isometric exercise causes the least intra-articular inflammation, pressure, and bone destruction.

You may get details of exercises at our website :
[link]