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physicaltherapy: 05 Feb : 06:54 PM

Is there anyone who has gone through CWT6 or type 1 evaluation with FCCPT?
If so, kindly let me know from where can the following deficiencies be fulfilled?
1. History
2. Systems Review
3. Findings that warrant referral
4. Supervision of support staff
5. Documentation

nani: 28 Sep : 04:31 AM

plz pleasec tell me where to do phd in india

Nikhilphysio: 02 Jun : 03:55 AM

I am working as physiotherapist in Shalby hospital ahmedabad for 4 years. I have passed out from Rajiv gandhi university of health and sciences Bangalore. I want to apply for Newzealand physiotherapy board registration so anyone there from India who got registered as physiotherapist in new zealand please help me.

Arun: 10 May : 12:36 AM

Hi Priyank, welcome. Feel free to go through these forum threads returned by search [link]

Priyank: 09 May : 10:28 PM

Hi..need advice. What are the options in Australia after MPT?


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Metal tantalum- better than titanium for joint implants.

Moderators: Arun, Boopathi, Robin, Diana, AJIN, MDK-Physio
Author Post
Sat Sep 22 2012, 05:17PM
Robin
Keep looking around. There's always something you've missed.

Registered Member #4
Joined: Thu Jul 08 2004, 06:56AM
Location: Kollam, Keralam, INDIA
Posts: 2120

Scientists are describing development of a potential implant material that flexes more like natural bone, fosters the growth of bone that keeps implants firmly in place and is less likely to fail.

Hongyi Li, Jinshu Wang and Zhenting Zhang explain that the metal tantalum has advantages over titanium, stainless steel and other metals used in the current generation of bone implants. For example, tantalum implants are more porous than titanium, encouraging bone growth and making the implants rougher and more elastic, like natural bone. So far, however, tantalum has found use mainly in devices that bridge fractures and other defects in bone, rather than in hip joint replacements and other joint implants. The scientists set out to find a new coating for tantalum to make better implants.

The results suggest that a film of tantalum oxide nanotubes — each more than 1,000 times thinner than a human hair — can help tantalum joint replacements integrate better with existing bone. The coating improves the anticorrosion, biocompatibility and other beneficial aspects of pure tantalum. The films also helped spur bone growth in tests with animal bone cells used as stand-ins for human bone.
Sourced from Medindia.net

 

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