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nani: 28 Sep : 04:31 AM

plz pleasec tell me where to do phd in india

Nikhilphysio: 02 Jun : 03:55 AM

I am working as physiotherapist in Shalby hospital ahmedabad for 4 years. I have passed out from Rajiv gandhi university of health and sciences Bangalore. I want to apply for Newzealand physiotherapy board registration so anyone there from India who got registered as physiotherapist in new zealand please help me.

Arun: 10 May : 12:36 AM

Hi Priyank, welcome. Feel free to go through these forum threads returned by search [link]

Priyank: 09 May : 10:28 PM

Hi..need advice. What are the options in Australia after MPT?

Arun: 04 Mar : 02:01 AM

Happy birthday Boopathi and somasimple


Research On Effectiveness Of The New KIVA Treatment Strategy For Painful Vertebral Compression Fractures.

Sunday 22 May 2011 - 05:50:26


back__pain.jpgPhysicians at The Medical College of Wisconsin are conducting a clinical trial to assess the safety and effectiveness of a new vertebral augmentation treatment (Kiva) for painful vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) due to osteoporosis. Sean Tutton, M.D, associate professor of radiology and surgery at the Medical College, is principal interventional radiology investigator for this multi-institutional, national trial. This prospective, randomized, controlled trial compares outcomes of the investigational Kiva device using a coil implant with cement, to the current treatment, kyphoplasty using small orthopedic balloons and cement to repair painful fractures of the spine.
"The study will evaluate whether the Kiva procedure, using a more elastic implant and less cement placed strategically, will be equally safe and effective to kyphoplasty" says Dr. Tutton. It may also demonstrate that the more elastic implant and use of less cement will prove superior to kyphoplasty.
The Kiva System, considered the next generation in the treatment for VCFs, is already approved in Europe. The Kiva system is useful for the reduction and the treatment of pathologic compression fractures of the vertebral body that may result from osteoporosis, in segments T10 to L5 of the spine. The device preserves cancellous architecture using a percutaneously introduced PEEK (Poliether etherKetone) implant in a continuous loop to form a nesting, cylindrical column. The implant is delivered over a removable guide wire to provide structural support to the vertebral body. A vertical displacement of the column results in endplate re-elevation and fracture reduction. Bone cement is delivered through the lumen of the implant, which provides contained interdigitation into the cancellous bone, thus stabilizing the fracture and minimizing the risk of extravasation. The Kiva system achieves an improvement in analog pain scales and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and has no adverse effects.
VCFs occur when a vertebra cracks, fractures, or collapses. These fractures are extremely painful and often debilitating. Over 700,000 osteoporosis-related vertebral compression fractures occur each year in the US alone. It is estimated that two-thirds of vertebral compression fractures are never diagnosed because many patients dismiss their back pain as a sign of aging and/or arthritis.
When bones become fragile and brittle from osteoporosis, everyday activities can trigger vertebral compression fractures. Bending to lift an object, missing a curb, or slipping on a wet surface can put the spine at risk of fracture. Multiple vertebral compression fractures significantly changes the structure and shape of the spine and can affect the internal organs and body functions, negatively impacting the overall health of the individual, daily activities, and quality of life.
The primary treatment for VCFs is typically conservative care consisting of bed rest, analgesics, and physical therapy. Interventional treatments for VCFs, include balloon kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty. These treatments aim to stabilize the fractures, providing earlier pain relief, and functional improvement.
From the available data the patients who failed conservative care at four to six weeks and then received vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty experienced significant reduction in pain, earlier resumption of normal activities and most importantly preservation of independence.
Individuals eligible for the KAST study must have one or two osteoporotic spine fractures, be over age 50, and have been unsuccessfully treated by conservative care for at least 6 weeks.

Source: Wisconsin medical college news release http://www.mcw.edu/Releases/2010Releases.htm

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